Social host liability for minors and underage drunk-driving accidents

Send email for updates


Effectiveness bank home page. Opens new windowResearch abstract

This entry is for a study added to the Effectiveness Bank but not fully analysed. Usually the entry consists only of the reference and an edited version of the original abstract, with either no commentary from Drug and Alcohol Findings or only essential points. The original study was not published by Findings; click Title to order a copy. Free reprints may be available from the authors – click prepared e-mail.

Links to other documents. Hover over for notes. Click to highlight passage referred to. Unfold extra text Unfold supplementary text
Copy title and link | Comment/query |

Social host liability for minors and underage drunk-driving accidents.

Dills A.K.
Journal of Health Economics: 2010, 29, p. 241–249.
Unable to obtain a copy by clicking title? Try asking the author for a reprint by adapting this prepared e-mail or by writing to Dr Dills at adills@wellesley.edu, angeladills@gmail.com. You could also try this alternative source.

US social host liability laws mean hosts of a private party can acquire civil liability if they supple alcohol to minors and that act leads to the injury to a third person. This analysis suggests such laws help prevent underage drunk-driving deaths.

Summary US social host laws for minors aim to reduce teenage alcohol consumption by imposing liability on adults who host parties. Parents cite safety reasons as part of their motivation for hosting parties, preferring their teens and their teens’ friends to drink in a supervised and safe locale. Both sides predict an effect of social host liability for minors on alcohol-related traffic accident rates for under-aged drinkers; the effects, however, work in opposite directions. This paper finds that, among 18–20 year olds, social host liability for minors reduced the drunk-driving fatality rate by 9%. I find no effect on sober traffic fatalities. Survey data on drinking and drunk driving suggest the declines resulted mostly from reductions in drunk driving and not reductions in drinking.

Last revised 14 July 2015. First uploaded 14 July 2015

Comment/query
Give us your feedback on the site (two-minute survey)
Open Effectiveness Bank home page
Add your name to the mailing list to be alerted to new studies and other site updates


Top 10 most closely related documents on this site. For more try a subject or free text search

STUDY 2008 Independent review of the effects of alcohol pricing and promotion

REVIEW 2016 A rapid evidence review of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of alcohol control policies: an English perspective

STUDY 2011 Achieving positive change in the drinking culture of Wales

REVIEW 2010 The effectiveness of tax policy interventions for reducing excessive alcohol consumption and related harms

REVIEW 2010 Polarized drinking patterns and alcohol deregulation. Trends in alcohol consumption, harms and policy: United Kingdom 1990–2010

REVIEW 2010 Effects of alcohol tax and price policies on morbidity and mortality: a systematic review

REVIEW 2012 Are alcohol prices and taxes an evidence-based approach to reducing alcohol-related harm and promoting public health and safety? A literature review

STUDY 2010 Policy options for alcohol price regulation: the importance of modelling population heterogeneity

REVIEW 2010 Effectiveness of policies maintaining or restricting days of alcohol sales on excessive alcohol consumption and related harms

REVIEW 2009 Effectiveness of limiting alcohol outlet density as a means of reducing excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms