The common core of therapy
 The common core of therapy

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The common core of therapy

Across mental health and behavioural problems, ‘Dodo bird’ findings that bona fide therapies have similar effects have turned attention to the ‘common factors’ they share rather than how they differ. A collection specially catalogued to explore this important issue starting with the analyses most recently added or updated, totalling today 81 documents.

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REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Evidence-based psychotherapy relationships: Psychotherapy relationships that work II

Based on new meta-analytic reviews, a US task force has authoritatively assessed what makes for an effective therapeutic relationship. Though not specific to substance use, this work will be critical to the recovery agenda for addiction treatment.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Evidence-based psychotherapy relationships: Alliance in individual psychotherapy

This comprehensive meta-analytic review commissioned by the American Psychological Association finds that the relationship between psychotherapist and client is one of the largest and most consistent indicators of outcomes. Authoritative practice recommendations will aid substance use counsellors and therapists.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Evidence-based psychotherapy relationships: The alliance in child and adolescent psychotherapy

This meta-analytic review commissioned by the American Psychological Association finds that the relationship between therapist and young clients matters about as much as for adults. Practice recommendations will aid counsellors, therapists and mental health teams dealing with young substance users.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Coping style

Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that externalising patients are best matched to psychotherapies focused on skill-building and symptom change, while those characterised by self-criticism and emotional avoidance benefit most from interpersonally focused and insight-oriented approaches.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Attachment style

Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that psychotherapy patients who feel secure in and easily form close and trusting intimate relationships have better outcomes, while the reverse is the case for those anxious about close relationships.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
What works for whom: tailoring psychotherapy to the person

Based on commissioned meta-analytic reviews, a US task force judged that adapting psychotherapy to the patient's reactance/resistance, preferences, culture, and religion/spirituality demonstrably improved effectiveness.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Culture

Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those for clients from a variety of backgrounds, and that more effective treatments had more cultural adaptations.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Preferences

Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that psychotherapy patients (including those treated for substance use problems) stay longer and do better if they get the type of therapy, type of therapist and type of therapeutic style they prefer.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Religion and spirituality

Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that psychotherapy patients who identify with the religious or spiritual orientation of a therapy improve more than if untreated or treated with exclusively secular therapies, but not more than if treated with otherwise equivalent established therapies.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Expectations

Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that patients who enter psychotherapy with positive expectations about outcomes tend to actually have better outcomes, suggesting that therapists should regularly assess expectations and take steps to enhance them if appropriate.


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