The common core of therapy
 The common core of therapy

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The common core of therapy

Across mental health and behavioural problems, ‘Dodo bird’ findings that bona fide therapies have similar effects have turned attention to the ‘common factors’ they share rather than how they differ. A collection specially catalogued to explore this important issue starting with the analyses most recently added or updated, totalling today 81 documents.

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STUDY 2009 HTM file
From in-session behaviors to drinking outcomes: a causal chain for motivational interviewing

This substudy from the seminal US Project MATCH alcohol treatment trial found evidence for the appealingly simple and plausible conclusions that "What therapists reflect back, they will hear more of," and that promoting talk about change promotes change itself.

OFFCUT 2006 PDF file 125Kb
Impulse smoking cessation resolutions twice as likely to stick as planned

The popular cycle of change model offers one way to envision intentional change but that is not the only or the most lasting way addiction is resolved; seemingly sudden conversions to abstinence are common and lead to more lasting remission.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
Counselor motivational interviewing skills and young adult change talk articulation during brief motivational interventions

In the study of Swiss army conscripts, reflective listening emerged as possibly the key active ingredient in a brief alcohol intervention based on motivational interviewing.

REVIEW ABSTRACT 2009 HTM file
Cognitive-behavioral treatment with adult alcohol and illicit drug users: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Cognitive-behavioural therapies are among the most widespread and influential approaches to substance use, yet this analysis found they conferred just a small advantage over other therapies. Perhaps other features are more important than the therapeutic 'brand'.

ABSTRACT 2008 HTM file
An intervention for treating alcohol dependence: relating elements of medical management to patient outcomes in primary care

In a programme intended to simulate primary care management of alcohol dependence, what made the difference to patients was how far the clinician maintained confident optimism and responded to the patient rather than strictly adhering to the treatment manual.

SERIES OF ARTICLES 2006 PDF file 6115Kb
Manners Matter

Five-part series not so much on what treatment services do, but how they do it. Conclusion: the same human qualities which make life better outside treatment make it better within - empathy, understanding, respect, responsiveness, caring persistence.

REVIEW 2004 PDF file 909Kb
The power of the welcoming reminder

Part 1 of the Manners Matter series. In seemingly mundane tasks like reminding patients of appointments and checking how they are doing after they leave, individualised and welcoming communications characterise retention-enhancing services.

REVIEW 2005 PDF file 449Kb
Can we help?

Part 2 of the Manners Matter series explores the neglected parts of service delivery – how to help people get there on time. Transport and childcare are key ingredients but a helping hand does more than help carry the load; it shows that you care.

REVIEW 2005 PDF file 813Kb
The motivational hallo

Part 3 of the Manners Matter series investigates motivational interviewing, the most influential counselling style in addiction treatment. At first we couldn't believe what we'd found - but it really has worked best without a manual.

REVIEW 2006 PDF file 1464Kb
Motivational arm twisting: contradiction in terms?

Part 4 of the Manners Matter series asks whether motivational interviewing can overcome the hostile prison environment and the distrust of youngsters, drink drivers and other offenders pressured into counselling by the criminal justice system.


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