Drugs: the complete collection
 Drugs: the complete collection

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Drugs: the complete collection

All Effectiveness Bank analyses to date of documents related to use and problem use of illegal drugs starting with the analyses most recently added or updated, totalling today 783 documents.

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REVIEW 2018 HTM file
A meta-analysis of the association between patients’ early treatment outcome expectation and their posttreatment outcomes

Constantino M.J., Coyne A.E., Vîsla A. et al.
Psychotherapy: 2018, 55(4), p. 373–485.
A review commissioned by the American Psychological Association found that patients who enter psychotherapy with positive expectations about outcomes tend to actually have better outcomes, suggesting therapists should regularly assess expectations and if indicated take steps to enhance them.

STUDY 2014 HTM file
Methadone induction in primary care for opioid dependence: a pragmatic randomized trial (ANRS Methaville)

Carrieri P.M., Michel L., Lions C. et al.
PLoS ONE: 2014, 9(11): e112328.
From France the first study to randomly allocate patients to start methadone maintenance either in primary care or at a specialist centre found primary care more attractive to patients, and no less effective at reducing street-opioid use and promoting engagement and retention.

STUDY 2013 HTM file
A randomized trial of cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care-based buprenorphine

Fiellin D.A., Barry D.T., Sullivan L.E. et al.
American Journal of Medicine: 2013, 126(1), 74.e11–74.e17.
Provide psychosocial therapy as well as buprenorphine, or extend treatment to more opioid-dependent patients by not requiring therapy? Across relatively uncomplicated patients treated at a primary care clinic, this US study found no benefit from cognitive-behavioural therapy, but other patients may need this kind of support to make the most of buprenorphine or methadone treatment.

MATRIX CELL 2018 HTM file
Drug Treatment Matrix cell B3: Practitioners; Medical treatment

Ashton M.
Seminal and key research and reviews on the influence of the practitioner in the medical treatment of drug dependence. Investigates the how clinician-patient relationships might be affected by enforcing clinic rules and the potential importance of doctors forming a “whole person’ relationship with patients.

STUDY 2018 HTM file
A randomized, open label trial of methadone continuation versus forced withdrawal in a combined US prison and jail: findings at 12 months post-release

Brinkley-Rubinstein L., McKenzie M., Macmadu A. et al.
Drug and Alcohol Dependence: 2018, 184, p. 57–63.
From the USA, a rare randomised trial found in favour of continuing methadone maintenance when patients entered prison rather than compulsory withdrawal. The potential benefits were most apparent in the near-100% continuation of protective treatment during the highly overdose-prone weeks after leaving prison.

DOCUMENT 2017 HTM file
Commissioning impact on drug treatment: The extent to which commissioning structures, the financial environment and wider changes to health and social welfare impact on drug misuse treatment and recovery

Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs.
[UK] Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, 2017.
Based on research, financial data and stakeholder surveys and testimonies, the UK government’s official drug policy advisers warn that without significant efforts to protect investment and quality, in England “loss of funding will result in the dismantling of a drug misuse treatment system that has brought huge improvement to the lives of people with drug and alcohol problems”.

MATRIX CELL 2018 HTM file
Drug Treatment Matrix cell A3: Interventions; Medical treatment

Ashton M.
Key studies on the effectiveness of medical interventions and treatment in medical settings.

STUDY 2017 HTM file
Effectiveness of injectable extended-release naltrexone vs daily buprenorphine–naloxone for opioid dependence: A randomized clinical noninferiority trial

Tanum L., Solli K.K., Latif Z.E. et al.
JAMA Psychiatry: 2017, 74(12), p. 1197–1205.
Can monthly injections of extended-release naltrexone be considered on a par with the standard daily opioid substitute in Norway for people wanting to maintain abstinence from heroin?

REVIEW 2017 HTM file
Supervised dosing with a long-acting opioid medication in the management of opioid dependence

Saulle R, Vecchi S, Gowing L.
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: 2017, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD011983.
Trials challenge the need for the widely accepted policy of making opioid-dependent patients take their methadone or other opioid substitutes at the clinic or pharmacy, but ‘no difference’ findings may be due to the limitations of the research.

STUDY 2014 HTM file
Treatment retention, drug use and social functioning outcomes in those receiving 3 months versus 1 month of supervised opioid maintenance treatment. Results from the Super C randomized controlled trial

Holland R, Maskrey V., Swift L. et al.
Addiction: 2014, 109(4), p. 596–607.
A randomised trial conducted in England found that the (at the time) recommended three months of supervised consumption of prescribed opioid substitutes like methadone conferred no significant advantages over supervising only for up to the first four weeks of treatment, but the findings applied only to the minority of patients for whom random allocation was thought feasible and safe.


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