The client–therapist relationship

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The client–therapist relationship

At the heart of addiction treatment lies client–therapist relationships, across psychosocial therapies a stronger influence on how well clients do than the type of therapy. A collection starting with the analyses most recently added or updated, totalling today 68 documents.

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REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Positive regard and psychotherapy outcome: a meta-analytic review

Findings amalgamated for the American Psychological Association show that across psychotherapy studies, outcomes improve the more therapists consistently demonstrate warmth and high regard for their clients – given the stigma and low regard attached to dependent substance use(rs), findings with important implications for promoting recovery.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
The real relationship and its role in psychotherapy outcome: a meta-analysis

[Consultation draft subject to amendment and correction.] Amalgamated findings in a review commissioned by the American Psychological Association indicate that patient progress and treatment quality are strongly related to the strength of the personal (‘real’) relationship between client and therapist – more strongly than the relationship focused on therapy or the type of therapy.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Meta-analysis of the alliance–outcome relation in couple and family therapy

[Consultation draft subject to amendment and correction.] Amalgamation and review of research findings commissioned by the American Psychological Association reveals that working relationships in couple and family therapies are at least as important as in individual therapies. Practice recommendations will help therapists develop these relationships, augmenting the impacts of some of the most effective ways to treat substance use problems.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Alliance rupture repair: a meta-analysis

Amalgamation of research findings commissioned by the American Psychological Association raises the intriguing possibility that experiencing the resolution of breakdowns or tensions (‘ruptures’) in the therapist–client relationship promotes client welfare even more than relationships with no ruptures. Evidence-based tips are given to help therapists resolve ruptures.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Therapist empathy and client outcome: an updated meta-analysis

Review commissioned by the American Psychological Association finds that the more therapists empathically communicate their understanding of and compassion for clients, the better the outcomes. Recommendations will help counsellors, therapists, trainers and supervisors foster this important foundation for therapist–client relationships.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
A meta-analysis of the association between patients’ early treatment outcome expectation and their posttreatment outcomes

A review commissioned by the American Psychological Association found that patients who enter psychotherapy with positive expectations about outcomes tend to actually have better outcomes, suggesting therapists should regularly assess expectations and if indicated take steps to enhance them.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Cohesion in group therapy: a meta-analysis

A review commissioned by the American Psychological Association suggests that fostering cohesion between leaders and groups and within groups is an important way to improve group therapy outcomes. Practice recommendations are offered to help group leaders make the most of this common substance use treatment modality.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Resistance/reactance level

Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that psychotherapy patients who characteristically exhibit low levels of resistance or reactance respond better to directive types of treatment, while reactive patients prone to resist direction respond best to non-directive approaches.

MATRIX CELL 2018 HTM file
Drug Treatment Matrix cell B5: Practitioners; Safeguarding the community

Key studies on the contribution of the practitioner to reducing crime and safeguarding the community. Risks formulating a general rule: The trickier the situation, the more the worker matters – suggesting that therapeutic skills are even more important in formally coerced than other forms of treatment. Also asks whether those skills can most effectively be deployed when therapy is divorced from criminal justice supervision.

MATRIX CELL 2018 HTM file
Alcohol Treatment Matrix cell B5: Practitioners; Safeguarding the community

Seminal and key studies on the impact of the practitioner in criminal justice work and safeguarding the community. Explores whether exceptional abilities are needed to forge productive therapeutic relationships in these situations.


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