Alcohol: the complete collection

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Alcohol: the complete collection

All Effectiveness Bank analyses to date of documents related to alcohol compiled for our supporter Alcohol Change UK, starting with the analyses most recently added or updated, totalling today 767 documents.

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STUDY 2014 HTM file
Alcohol treatment in England 2013–14

Public Health England.
Public Health England, 2014.
In England a record 114,920 adults were in specialist alcohol treatment in 2013/14 and nearly 4 in 10 left as planned free of dependence. A good record, but probably still most dependent drinkers who might have benefited from treatment did without it, partly because relatively few found their way there via GPs and emergency departments.

REVIEW 1999 HTM file
Barriers to implementing effective correctional drug treatment programs

Farabee D, Prendergast M., Cartier J. et al.
Prison Journal: 1999, 79(2), p. 150–162.
Expertly describes and evaluates the difficulties of mounting drug treatment programmes in prisons, drawing on the pooled knowledge and experience of leading US researchers on why real-world programmes sometimes fail to live up to expectations based on more ideal-world trials. Though focused on prison, much is relevant also to community sentences.

STUDY 2014 HTM file
Assessing the availability of and need for specialist alcohol treatment services in Scotland

Clark I, Simpson L.
NHS Health Scotland, 2014.
Evidence that in 2012 Scotland’s alcohol treatment caseload equated to about 1 in 4 of the country’s alcohol-dependent adults, over three times the 1 in 14 ratio in England, partly a consequence of extra funding accompanying Scotland’s 2009 national alcohol strategy. Evidence too of a peer-based recovery orientation taking root.

STUDY 2012 HTM file
Implementation issues in an innovative rural substance misuser treatment program

Godlaski T.M., Clark J.J.
Substance Use and Misuse: 2012, 47, p. 1439–1450.
Detailed, frank and compelling account of what it takes in the real world (when implementers have to grapple with counsellors and organisations over which they have no control) to introduce a new treatment approach. Key lesson is that each organisation is different; being there, learning about that unique context, and taking it in to account, is what’s needed to give implementation a chance.

STUDY 2014 HTM file
Potential benefits of minimum unit pricing for alcohol versus a ban on below cost selling in England 2014: modelling study

Brennan A., Meng Y., Holmes J. et al.
BMJ: 2014, 349, g5452.
When for England the UK government reverted from a proposed minimum unit price for alcohol to a ban on pricing below duty plus VAT, they abandoned a policy that would probably have had 40–50 times the impact on consumption and reaped correspondingly greater health gains.

REVIEW 2013 HTM file
Meta-analysis of the effects of MI training on clinicians’ behavior

De Roten Y., Zimmermann G., Ortega D. et al.
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment: 2013, 45, p. 155–162.
The first analysis to amalgamate findings on training clinicians in motivational interviewing finds training does develop competence, especially when reinforced by supervision or coaching based on feedback on trainees’ actual performance. For some trainees there may be no need for initial training to be face-to-face; books and videos may do as well.

STUDY 2014 HTM file
Relative efficacy of mindfulness-based relapse prevention, standard relapse prevention, and treatment as usual for substance use disorders: a randomized clinical trial

Bowen S., Witkiewitz K., Clifasefi S.L. et al.
JAMA Psychiatry: 2014, 71(5), p. 547–556.
Promising signs – but from a single study at a single treatment agency – that integrating Buddhism-inspired mindfulness-based elements creates a more effective supplement to usual (in the US context) 12-step based aftercare than a purely cognitive behavioural approach, helping patients sustain gains from initial intensive treatment.

REVIEW 2014 HTM file
Interventions to reduce substance misuse among vulnerable young people

[UK] National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Evidence Update April 2014
In this evidence update, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence assess new evidence relevant to its earlier public health guidance on interventions to reduce substance misuse among vulnerable young people.

STUDY 2013 HTM file
An evaluation of the implementation of, and compliance with, the objectives of the Licensing (Scotland) Act 2005: final report

MacGregor A., Sharp C., Mabelis J. et al.
NHS Health Scotland, 2013
Scotland’s 2005 licensing reforms placed it in the vanguard across the UK, notably in adding public health to licensing objectives. There were important positives, but implementing this key measure foundered on the difficulty of relating decisions on individual licensed premises to health trends across an area.

REVIEW 2012 HTM file
Clinical recognition and recording of alcohol disorders by clinicians in primary and secondary care: meta-analysis

Mitchell A.J., Meader N., Bird V. et al.
British Journal of Psychiatry: 2012, 201, p. 93–100.
The policy emphasis on systematic screening to identify risky drinkers seems justified by this review, which found that without this GPs and other non-specialist doctors and nurses missed about half the risky drinkers they saw. However, that is better than in many screening programmes, prompting the reviewers to query whether these really do improve on clinical judgement.


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