Alcohol: the complete collection

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Alcohol: the complete collection

All Effectiveness Bank analyses to date of documents related to alcohol compiled for our supporter Alcohol Change UK, starting with the analyses most recently added or updated, totalling today 768 documents.

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REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Coping style

Beutler L.E., Harwood M.T., Kimpara S. et al.
Journal of Clinical Psychology: 2011, 67(2), p. 176–183.
Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that externalising patients are best matched to psychotherapies focused on skill-building and symptom change, while those characterised by self-criticism and emotional avoidance benefit most from interpersonally focused and insight-oriented approaches.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Attachment style

Levy K.N., Ellison W.D., Scott L.N. et al.
Journal of Clinical Psychology: 2011, 67(2), p. 193–203.
Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that psychotherapy patients who feel secure in and easily form close and trusting intimate relationships have better outcomes, while the reverse is the case for those anxious about close relationships.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Stages of change

Norcross J.C., Krebs P.M., Prochaska J.O.
Journal of Clinical Psychology: 2011, 67(2), p. 143–154.
Prochaska and DiClemente's stages of change reliably predict how well psychotherapy patients will do based on their initial stage, but no relevant studies were found on whether matching therapy to the patient's initial stage of change improves outcomes.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
What works for whom: tailoring psychotherapy to the person

Norcross J.C., Krebs P.M., Prochaska J.O.
Journal of Clinical Psychology: 2011, 67(2), p. 127–132.
Based on commissioned meta-analytic reviews, a US task force judged that adapting psychotherapy to the patient's reactance/resistance, preferences, culture, and religion/spirituality demonstrably improved effectiveness.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Culture

Smith T.B., Domenech Rodríguez M., Bernal G.
Journal of Clinical Psychology: 2011, 67(2), p. 166–175.
Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those for clients from a variety of backgrounds, and that more effective treatments had more cultural adaptations.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Preferences

Swift J.K., Callahan J.L., Vollmer B.M.
Journal of Clinical Psychology: 2011, 67(2), p. 155–165.
Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that psychotherapy patients (including those treated for substance use problems) stay longer and do better if they get the type of therapy, type of therapist and type of therapeutic style they prefer.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Religion and spirituality

Worthington E.L., Hook J.N., Davis D.E. et al.
Journal of Clinical Psychology: 2011, 67(2), p. 204–214.
Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that psychotherapy patients who identify with the religious or spiritual orientation of a therapy improve more than if untreated or treated with exclusively secular therapies, but not more than if treated with otherwise equivalent established therapies.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Adapting psychotherapy to the individual patient: Expectations

Constantino M.J., Arnkoff D.B., Glass C.R. et al.
Journal of Clinical Psychology: 2011, 67(2), p. 184–192.
Meta-analytic review commissioned by a US task force concludes that patients who enter psychotherapy with positive expectations about outcomes tend to actually have better outcomes, suggesting that therapists should regularly assess expectations and take steps to enhance them if appropriate.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
The challenge of external validity in policy-relevant systematic reviews: a case study from the field of substance misuse

Pearson M., Coomber R.
Addiction: 2010, 105(1), p. 136–145.
Observations by researchers who participated in the process suggest that the development of UK guidance on the prevention of substance misuse in young people was hampered by a focus on methodological purity rather than the real-world relevance of the studies included in the underlying review of evidence.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
Reducing sex under the influence of drugs or alcohol for patients in substance abuse treatment

Calsyn D.A., Crits-Christoph P., Hatch-Maillette M.A. et al.
Addiction: 2010, 105(1), p. 100–108.
At issue was whether among men in treatment for substance use problems the standard one session of HIV education could be improved on by five sessions including motivational exercises and skills training. In the short term there were greater reductions in sex under the influence but these did not last.


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