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You have found 77 entries after clicking the GO button or a search link in a hot topic. Starting with the most recently added or updated entries, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2009 HTM file
Review of the Glasgow & Fife drug courts

For Britain, US-inspired drug courts seemed a way to meld justice with treatment in to a more powerful anti-crime force than looser liaisons. But this Scottish study found no detectable anti-crime benefit; instead the main impact seems to have been to substantially raise costs.

REVIEW 2008 HTM file
Drug testing in schools evidence, impacts and alternatives

Australian review supports UK guidance indicating that testing school pupils for illegal drugs is a risky procedure of unproven effectiveness and questionable ethics which may backfire by alienating pupils.

REVIEW 2009 HTM file
Refocusing drug-related law enforcement to address harms

'Target enforcement to reduce individual and community harm' is the premise of this report from a UK drug policy think tank, one which seems widely understood, though in some quarters, deeply contested.

REVIEW 2008 HTM file
Identifying cost-effective interventions to reduce the burden of harm associated with alcohol misuse in Australia

Comprehensive calculations from Australia offer clues to what in countries like the UK would make the biggest dent in alcohol-related harm at the lowest cost; top of the list were alcohol tax rises, advertising bans, licensing controls, and random breath testing.

STUDY 2005 PDF file 103Kb
Offenders do better in treatment if sanctions credible and clear

Offenders in New York ordered to the same residential therapeutic communities stayed longer and later committed fewer crimes if sent by criminal justice programmes which had credible sanctions and ensured offenders understand these and knew they were being monitored.

STUDY 2005 PDF file 104Kb
US study finds penalties for drug dealing near schools fail to shift dealers

For over a decade many US states have mandated especially severe penalties for drug dealing near schools. Just as the UK started down the same route, the only US study of the effectiveness of this strategy found it did nothing to drive dealing away from schools.

STUDY 2005 PDF file 107Kb
UK prison drug testing deters cannabis use more than heroin use

Interviews with prisoners in England and Wales and trends in positive prison drug tests appeared to confirm concerns that testing would lead prisoners to replace cannabis with heroin because heroin is detectable in urine for a far shorter time.

STUDY 2009 HTM file
Evaluation of the mandatory drug testing of arrestees pilot

Scotland withdrew funding when it saw this evaluation of testing for heroin/cocaine use on arrest. It looked like a very expensive way to get a few users in to treatment; at two of the three sites, six to eight times more costly per treatment entry than voluntary referral.

STUDY 2005 PDF file 140Kb
Flexible DTTOs do most to cut crime

More flexible supervision requirements and more methadone treatment may account for why treatment-based court orders are completed far more often in Scotland than in England, improving recidivism rates.

STUDY 2008 HTM file
Dedicated drug court pilots: a process report

Following the Scottish example, England has piloted drug courts using specially trained magistrates to closely supervise treatment-based community sentences. This initial report found no major glitches but low throughput and uncertain cost-benefits.


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