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You have found 11 entries. Starting with analyses of the most recently published documents, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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DOCUMENT 2017 HTM file
Drug misuse and dependence: UK guidelines on clinical management

Last published in 2007, there is no more important document for UK clinicians involved in treating problem drug use than the so-called ‘Orange guidelines’. This major update offers detailed guidance on the range of problems, settings and patients clinicians encounter, substantially informing judgements of what constitutes good medical practice.

DOCUMENT 2015 HTM file
American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) national practice guideline for the use of medications in the treatment of addiction involving opioid use

From the USA’s professional society for clinicians and allied professionals in the field of addiction medicine, comprehensive recommendations on how doctors can use medications to treat addiction to heroin and other opioids.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
Ultra-rapid opiate detoxification followed by nine months of naltrexone maintenance therapy in Iran

Further evidence from Iran that rapid withdrawal from opioids under anaesthesia followed by the opioid-blocking drug naltrexone can work for highly motivated caseloads with copious 'recovery capital'. For others this expensive and when not adequately controlled, potentially risky procedure generally ends in overdose-threatening relapse.

REVIEW 2009 HTM file
Pharmacotherapies for the treatment of opioid dependence: efficacy, cost-effectiveness and implementation guidelines

From some of the same Australian authors who produced classic texts on maintenance prescribing for heroin addiction, a major new text analysing research on all types of drug-based interventions including maintenance, opiate-blocking drugs, and managing withdrawal.

DOCUMENT 2009 HTM file
Guidelines for the psychosocially assisted pharmacological treatment of opioid dependence

Unequivocal backing from UN agencies for methadone and other forms of long term maintenance treatments as the prime modality for the treatment of dependence on heroin and allied drugs. In contrast say the experts, detoxification results in poor long term outcomes.

STUDY 2005 PDF file 153Kb
Anaesthesia during rapid opiate detox raises costs but not outcomes

Dutch study finds that anaesthetising patients during accelerated opiate withdrawal is expensive and introduces new risks, but does not help inpatients complete detoxification or sustain drug use reductions on discharge.

STUDY 2004 PDF file 109Kb
Rapid detoxification facilitates transfer to naltrexone but gains fade

Relative to usual procedures, in the Netherlands, Australia and the USA, rapid withdrawal under anaesthesia enabled more opiate dependent patients to transfer to naltrexone and remain opiate free in the short-term, but within a year gains had diminished.

REVIEW 2003 PDF file 178Kb
Lofexidine safe and effective in opiate detoxification

Cochrane review concludes that lofexidine almost matches methadone for opiate detoxification and has fewer side effects than clonidine, making it preferable when opiate-type drugs are contra-indicated. Extended text includes details of relevant studies.

STUDY 2003 PDF file 189Kb
Rapid opiate detoxification feasible at home

Spanish study suggests that given suitable patients and a suitable home environment, rapid detoxification from opiates can be done at home without on-site professional supervision.

STUDY 2003 PDF file 164Kb
Naltrexone implants could reduce the early relapse rate after detoxification

Studies from the UK and Germany suggest that subcutaneous implants of naltrexone which block the effects of heroin for up to seven weeks could help reduce the early relapse rate after detoxification more effectively than the oral form of the medication.


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