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You have found 33 entries. Sorted by the main topic addressed, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2014 HTM file
Drugs: international comparators

After seeing how drug policy worked overseas, UK government ministers and officials returned saying, “there is no apparent correlation between the ‘toughness’ of a country’s approach and the prevalence of adult drug use”, and that “better health outcomes for drug users cannot be shown to be a direct result of the enforcement approach”.

REVIEW 2009 HTM file
Pharmacotherapies for the treatment of opioid dependence: efficacy, cost-effectiveness and implementation guidelines

From some of the same Australian authors who produced classic texts on maintenance prescribing for heroin addiction, a major new text analysing research on all types of drug-based interventions including maintenance, opiate-blocking drugs, and managing withdrawal.

DOCUMENT 2012 HTM file
Has methadone been rehabilitated?

Arousing visceral opposition and passionate defence, prescribing opiate-type drugs for as long as needed has for decades been the mainstay of heroin addiction treatment in Britain. With the weight of government behind them, that position was challenged by ‘recovery’ advocates; in 2012 an expert report sought to reconcile the competing perspectives.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
A survey of community drug team prescribing policies and client views

Contrary to national guidelines, in the mid-2000s in England and Wales, prescribed doses of the heroin substitute methadone were generally low, and often even new patients were not required to take it under supervision at the pharmacy. Patients in Essex also generally favoured low doses and opposed supervised consumption.

REVIEW 2010 HTM file
A review of opioid dependence treatment: pharmacological and psychosocial interventions to treat opioid addiction

This wide-ranging review uniquely draws together findings from authoritative reviews of rigorous research conducted for the Cochrane collaboration and later studies concerned with the pharmacological and psychosocial treatment of dependence on opiate-type drugs like heroin, concluding that retention is the common key to success.

HOT TOPIC 2015 HTM file
Prescribing opiate-type drugs to opiate addicts: good sense or nonsense?

One of our hot topics offering background and analysis on important issues which sometimes generate heated debate. For decades deeply felt and at times intemperate debate has surrounded a treatment which achieves unparalleled success by going with the grain of addiction, prescribing the same type of drug which opiate-dependent patients used illegally – a substitution castigated as surrender or hailed as an enlightened lifesaver.

STUDY 1999 PDF file 182Kb
Heroin prescribing can help methadone's failures

Studies in UK and Switzerland show that many opiate-dependent patients failed by oral methadone, or seeking treatment but unwilling to give up heroin, do better if prescribed heroin in terms of crime, illicit opiate use and psychological wellbeing.

STUDY 2000 PDF file 144Kb
Methadone's failures respond to heroin

A large-scale trial in Switzerland suggests that despite failures with other treatments, many long-term heroin addicts respond well to a treatment based on injectable heroin.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 107Kb
Injectable methadone maintenance suitable for more severely affected heroin addicts

Conducted in London, the first study to randomise opiate dependent patients to injectable versus oral methadone maintenance suggested that the injectable option is preferable for addicts with relatively severe health and psychological problems.

STUDY 2003 PDF file 235Kb
First large-scale randomised trial boosts case for heroin prescribing

From the Netherlands, the first large-scale, randomised trial found that for patients previously failed by oral methadone, prescribing injectable or smokable heroin instead greatly reduces crime and improves health and social functioning.


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