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You have found 91 entries. Starting with analyses of the most recently published documents, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2007 HTM file
Day hospital and residential addiction treatment: randomized and nonrandomized managed care clients

By selecting clients at the very edge of ethically requiring referral to residential care, this US study confirms that unless there are pressing contraindications, intensive non-residential options deliver equivalent outcomes. Often of course, there ARE pressing contraindications.

STUDY 2007 HTM file
A randomized controlled trial of intensive referral to 12-step self-help groups: one-year outcomes

Even in a largely 12-step oriented programme, this US study showed that persistent and practical efforts can modestly strengthen 12-step group involvement after treatment and improve outcomes.

SERIES OF ARTICLES 2006 PDF file 6115Kb
Manners Matter

Five-part series not so much on what treatment services do, but how they do it. Conclusion: the same human qualities which make life better outside treatment make it better within - empathy, understanding, respect, responsiveness, caring persistence.

STUDY 2006 PDF file 161Kb
Warning sign aftercare for drinkers improves attendance and avoids relapse

Graduates from a British intensive day programme for alcohol dependence were trained to analyse why they had last relapsed in order to recognise and cope with the warning signs. The result was fewer relapses without significantly increased health and treatment costs.

STUDY 2006 PDF file 116Kb
Initiating methadone prescribing in prison promotes its continuation on release

From Baltimore a study which shows that offering substitution treatment in prison to offenders whose offending was driven by opiate dependence means they are much more likely to continue treatment on release, helping to cut crime.

STUDY 2006 PDF file 106Kb
Improving continuity of care in a public addiction treatment system with clinical case management

In Philadelphia intensive case management created the kind of post-detoxification continuity of care which dramatically cut repeated admissions for detoxification, increased the numbers able to be treated, and offered patients a better chance of gaining lasting stability.

STUDY 2006 PDF file 111Kb
Lessons of failure of Scottish scheme to link released prisoners to services

From 2001 an innovative Scottish scheme aimed to seamlessly link problem drug users released from prison to the services they needed to stay out of trouble; its failure shows how intensive and systematic such attempts must be to overcome logistical barriers and motivate the offender.

STUDY 2005 PDF file 170Kb
'Real-world' studies show that medications do suppress heavy drinking

Three trials found that drugs commonly used to treat alcohol dependence improve outcomes for an appreciable minority of patients, even under conditions close to normal practice. Together they offer clues to who benefits most from each medication.

REVIEW 2005 PDF file 826Kb
Self help: don't leave it to the patients

Keith Humphreys and colleagues report on a workgroup of US experts on substance abuse self-help organisations. Main conclusion: self-help groups are too valuable to leave to chance. They should be actively promoted and facilitated by treatment services and policymakers.

STUDY 2005 PDF file 180Kb
Aftercare calls suit less relapse-prone patients

An intensive US outpatient programme found that for less relapse-prone patients, a flexible aftercare regime mixing initial support groups with regular phone calls was at least as effective as entirely face-to-face contact, yet far less time-consuming.


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