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You have found 294 entries after clicking on a search link (usually the MORE information link) in a matrix cell. Sorted by the main topic addressed, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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HOT TOPIC 2021 HTM file
‘Dangerous data’: drinking after dependence

First cracked in 1960s London, the orthodoxy that abstinence is the only feasible treatment goal for ‘alcoholics’ seemed shattered in 1973 by evidence that even physically dependent patients could learn to drink in moderation. Controversy was fierce, reaching the US Congress, TV networks and the courts. Explore the history and contested research behind an issue facing every dependent drinker starting treatment.

STUDY 2000 PDF file 118Kb
Confidence helps resist a return to drinking

A Scottish study suggests that severely alcoholic men lacking social supports for a drink-free life can be trained to resist a return to heavy drinking, as long as they are helped to feel sufficiently confident in their abilities.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 171Kb
Encouraging people to return for aftercare

Two simple inexpensive interventions have been shown to make a substantial difference to the rate of return for aftercare following intensive day or residential care, helping maintain the benefits especially for the most vulnerable patients.

STUDY 2008 HTM file
Benefits of residential care preserved by systematic, persistent and welcoming aftercare prompts

Systematically applying simple prompts and motivators can improve aftercare attendance and help sustain progress made during initial residential treatment, offering a way to preserve the benefits of the investment made by patients, services and funders.

STUDY 2004 PDF file 99Kb
How to transform a poor aftercare attendance record into an excellent one

Through a series of inexpensive or cost-free initiatives each building on the other, researchers at the US Salem Veterans Affairs medical centre transformed its aftercare attendance record and improved substance use outcomes.

STUDY 2008 HTM file
Promoting continuing care adherence among substance abusers with co-occurring psychiatric disorders following residential treatment

Further analysis of findings from a US inpatient centre shows that systematically applying simple prompts and motivators especially and substantially improved aftercare attendance among patients with mental health problems, helping sustain progress made during initial treatment.

STUDY 2005 PDF file 180Kb
Aftercare calls suit less relapse-prone patients

An intensive US outpatient programme found that for less relapse-prone patients, a flexible aftercare regime mixing initial support groups with regular phone calls was at least as effective as entirely face-to-face contact, yet far less time-consuming.

REVIEW ABSTRACT 2009 HTM file
Continuing care research: what we have learned and where we are going

Are alcohol and drug dependence best treated as chronic conditions needing extended care, or should we expect patients to recover and leave treatment? Whatever the answer, this review finds that generally the offer of long-term continuing care leads to better outcomes.

STUDY 2006 PDF file 161Kb
Warning sign aftercare for drinkers improves attendance and avoids relapse

Graduates from a British intensive day programme for alcohol dependence were trained to analyse why they had last relapsed in order to recognise and cope with the warning signs. The result was fewer relapses without significantly increased health and treatment costs.

STUDY 2011 HTM file
Extended telephone-based continuing care for alcohol dependence: 24-month outcomes and subgroup analyses

At Philadelphia clinics seeing alcohol- (and often cocaine-) dependent patients, spending on average another nine minutes to offer counselling as well as progress checks during aftercare phone calls made the difference between a programme which did rather than did not consistently improve on usual arrangements, at least while it was operative.


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