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You have found 52 entries. Sorted by the main topic addressed, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions in primary care populations

Update of a key document forming the basis of claims that brief interventions work in ‘real-world’ settings. Combined findings from randomised trials confirm that brief advice in primary care can reduce drinking, but will those reductions be realised in contemporary routine practice?

DOCUMENT 2015 HTM file
Alcohol-use disorders

Online flowcharts from the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guide planners and practitioners dealing with alcohol use disorders through choices of strategies and interventions on prevention, brief interventions, alcohol treatment, and treatment of associated medical conditions.

STUDY 2011 HTM file
Reducing the impact of alcohol-related harm to Londoners – how well are we doing?

Seven years after the first alcohol harm reduction strategy for England, this audit finds treatment access and brief intervention work has progressed in London but funding is often precarious and GP services are surprisingly under-developed.

STUDY 2011 HTM file
South East Alcohol Innovation Programme: evaluation report

In the south east of England a bidding exercise spawned a spate of short-term innovative projects to reduce alcohol-related harm, from which five models were assessed as most promising and taken forward for further implementation and assessment the following year – a rapid and intensive test bed from which others can learn as well.

REVIEW 1999 PDF file 841Kb
How brief can you get?

Three pioneering British studies dating back to the late '70s showed that alcohol problems could be reduced without intensive (and expensive) treatments. The implications were and remain immense, the controversy fierce.

STUDY 1999 PDF file 209Kb
Advice and referral curb drinking in alcohol dependent hospital patients

In New York the serendipitous misapplication of a brief intervention to alcohol-dependent general hospital patients raised the possibility that they benefit as much from this as from referral to full-blown treatment.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 187Kb
Emergency patients benefit from minimal alcohol intervention

Patients screened for alcohol problems in a Swedish emergency surgical ward responded well to a simple brief intervention delivered by ward staff; outcomes were not further improved by professional counselling.

REVIEW 2002 PDF file 1279Kb
Investing in alcohol treatment: brief interventions

Second instalment of the comprehensive review funded by Australia's health department examines brief talks to heavy drinkers identified at hospitals or in primary care. Do they work, and how can staff be encouraged to implement them?

STUDY 2003 PDF file 172Kb
Injury rate cut in heavy drinking accident and emergency patients

One of the few studies to have tried alcohol interventions in the emergency department rather than after admission was also the first to find a significant reduction in later injuries, but only if the initial approach had been reinforced with a booster.

STUDY 2003 PDF file 188Kb
Nurses help prevent hazardous drinking while caring for injured drinkers

This British study found that young men injured after binge drinking respond well to a brief intervention mounted in a hospital clinic dealing with injuries of the kind often related to drinking.


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