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You have found 52 entries. Sorted by the main topic addressed, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2012 HTM file
Randomized controlled trial of mailed personalized feedback for problem drinkers in the emergency department: the short-term impact

At Australian emergency departments, screening followed by written personalised feedback mailed to risky drinkers led to at least a short-term cutback in their drinking, but only when they saw or had cause to see drink as contributing to their medical misfortune. This low cost written option demanding little of staff may make intervention more feasible.

STUDY 2011 HTM file
An evaluation to assess the implementation of NHS delivered alcohol brief interventions: final report

In three years from 2008 Scottish national policy drove delivery of nearly 175,000 brief alcohol interventions, testament to what can be done when policy is backed by funding and infrastructure and incentive payments contingent on implementation. Leverage and acceptance were greatest in primary care, where the vast majority of the work took place.

STUDY 2011 HTM file
Randomized controlled trial of a brief intervention for unhealthy alcohol use in hospitalized Taiwanese men

Even dependent drinkers among Taiwanese hospital patients substantially cut back their drinking after being identified and offered brief advice, findings from a study which provides one of the most convincing demonstrations yet that brief intervention can work in this setting.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
A systematic review and meta-analysis of health care utilization outcomes in alcohol screening and brief intervention trials

Screening for risky drinking and offering brief advice slightly reduces later emergency department visits was the main finding of this review, suggesting these programmes can help ease pressure on overloaded departments. Adding to their attraction, some of the evidence comes from studies in the services set to benefit.

STUDY 2014 HTM file
The effectiveness of alcohol screening and brief intervention in emergency departments: a multicentre pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial

‘Do just the minimum’ seems the message of the emergency department arm of the largest alcohol screening and brief intervention study yet conducted in Britain; the proportion of risky drinkers fell no less after a brief warning than after more sophisticated and longer interventions.

STUDY 2012 HTM file
Alcohol screening and brief intervention in emergency departments

The emergency department arm of the largest alcohol screening and brief intervention study yet conducted in Britain found that the proportion of risky drinkers fell just as much after the most minimal of screening and intervention methods as after more sophisticated and longer (but still brief) alternatives.

REVIEW 2015 HTM file
A comparison of the efficacy of brief interventions to reduce hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption between European and non-European countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Amalgamation of results from relevant studies finds that in high-income nations brief alcohol advice to emergency or primary care patients remains effective whether trials take place in European or non-European drinking cultures and health service contexts. Impacts were however small and may not be duplicated in routine practice.

STUDY 2014 HTM file
A multisite randomized controlled trial of brief intervention to reduce drinking in the trauma care setting: how brief is brief?

US trauma centres dealing with serious and often alcohol-related injuries ought to offer an environment conducive to brief alcohol interventions, but this first multi-site trial found motivational counselling more effective than minimal advice only when combined with a follow-up ‘booster’ phone call.

REVIEW 2015 HTM file
Brief interventions to prevent recurrence and alcohol-related problems in young adults admitted to the emergency ward following an alcohol-related event: a systematic review

Analysis of the only four randomised trials of brief alcohol interventions among 18–24-years-olds seen at emergency departments after getting drunk tentatively suggested that booster sessions or later advice are needed to reduce drinking.

REVIEW 2013 HTM file
Interventions for reducing alcohol consumption among general hospital inpatient heavy alcohol users: a systematic review

Review of studies of interventions for heavy drinkers identified among general hospital inpatients concluded that multi-session brief interventions could reduce drinking. “Could” is an important qualifier: yet to be pinned down is why though sometimes they work, brief interventions often fail to produce significant effects.


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