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You have found 52 entries. Sorted by the main topic addressed, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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REVIEW 2012 HTM file
Screening, brief intervention, and referral for alcohol use in adolescents: a systematic review

‘Inconclusive’ was the verdict of a review which aimed to assess the effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions among patients aged 11 to 21 attending for emergency care in the USA. Most promising targets seem to have been the more heavy or irresponsibly drinking among patients who were young adults rather than adolescents.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions in primary care populations

Update of a key document forming the basis of claims that brief interventions work in ‘real-world’ settings. Combined findings from randomised trials confirm that brief advice in primary care can reduce drinking, but will those reductions be realised in contemporary routine practice?

STUDY 2008 HTM file
Screening, brief interventions, referral to treatment (SBIRT) for illicit drug and alcohol use at multiple healthcare sites: comparison at intake and 6 months later

This huge US study set out to test whether widespread screening and brief intervention for illegal drug use (not just heavy drinking) could be implemented in a variety of general medical settings and whether it was effective. Both tests seem to have been passed, but with some important caveats.

STUDY 2009 HTM file
Does implementation of clinical practice guidelines change nurses' screening for alcohol and other substance use?

Hospital nurses in Sydney in Australia were trained to implement a new screening and intervention policy aiming to upgrade the identification of hazardous drinkers and other substance users among medical and surgical inpatients. Disappointing results highlight the need to do more than inform and exhort if practice is to change.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
A comparison of two single-item screeners for hazardous drinking and alcohol use disorder

Can you get away with asking just a single question to identify risky drinkers and even dependent drinkers? When the thresholds are suitably adjusted, asking either about frequency of heavy drinking or maximum single-occasion consumption worked remarkably well in the US general population.

STUDY 2009 HTM file
Consultation-liaison psychiatry in general hospitals: improvement in physicians’ detection rates of alcohol use disorders

When an addiction psychiatrist modelled good alcohol assessment practice while accompanying doctors once a week during their ward rounds, the result was steeply increased rates of correct diagnosis of drink problems and of referral to treatment, offering an alternative to possibly unwelcome training or direction of clinical staff.

REVIEW 2010 HTM file
Brief screening questionnaires to identify problem drinking during pregnancy: a systematic review

Heavy drinking by mothers-to-be threatens their unborn child – but for that very reason, stigma may mean women shy away from admitting their problem. This review found several brief screening questionnaires showed promise in identifying mothers who might need to cut back, while others seemed unsuitable for the antenatal care context.

STUDY 1970 HTM file
Frontiers of alcoholism

Later to become founding director of the US National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, in the late 1950s Dr Morris Chafetz of the Massachusetts General Hospital conducted a remarkable series of studies which proved that an alcohol clinic's intake and performance can be transformed by the simple application of empathy and organisation.

STUDY 2013 HTM file
Modeling the impact of alcohol dependence on mortality burden and the effect of available treatment interventions in the European Union

Simulation exercise estimates that had either the main anti-relapse medications or brief interventions on hospital wards reached 40% of the heaviest and dependent drinkers, in 2004 they would have prevented nearly 12,000 deaths across the European Union.

STUDY 2015 HTM file
Computer-delivered screening and brief intervention for alcohol use in pregnancy: a pilot randomized trial

A computer-delivered brief intervention plus booster mailings increased the alcohol abstinence rate and improved pregnancy outcomes among risky drinking pregnant women recruited at a US antenatal clinic, though in this small pilot trial the results were not statistically significant.


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