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You have found 72 entries. Starting with the most recently added or updated entries, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions in primary care populations

Update of a key document forming the basis of claims that brief interventions work in ‘real-world’ settings. Combined findings from randomised trials confirm that brief advice in primary care can reduce drinking, but will those reductions be realised in contemporary routine practice?

STUDY 1992 HTM file
Health promotion in the general practice consultation: a minute makes a difference

‘A minute makes a difference in primary care consultations’, was the finding of a 1992 study about improving the capacity of general practitioners to screen for problems such as heavy drinking, smoking, and high blood pressure. But is extra time on the clock enough to secure routine (as opposed to more frequent) delivery of health promotion and brief intervention?

STUDY 2016 HTM file
Strategies in primary healthcare to implement early identification of risky alcohol consumption: why do they work or not? A qualitative evaluation of the ODHIN study

What do primary care clinicians think would help them bridge the ‘implementation gap’ in screening for risky drinking and brief advice, and extend the potential benefits to a greater proportion of the population? A European trial found the answer differed depending on distinctive national circumstances.

STUDY 2019 HTM file
Impact of the introduction and withdrawal of financial incentives on the delivery of alcohol screening and brief advice in English primary health care: an interrupted time-series analysis

The clearest impact of financial incentives to screen primary care patients in England was the plummeting screening rate after the incentives were withdrawn. If these results are applicable to England as a whole, over the following 21 months withdrawing the payments resulted in 603,719 fewer patients being screened for risky drinking and 27,439 fewer receiving brief advice.

STUDY 2016 HTM file
Improving the delivery of brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary health care: outcome results of the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Intervention (ODHIN) five-country cluster randomized factorial trial

The EU-funded ODHIN trial tested eight strategies to promote screening and brief interventions for risky drinking in primary health care units in five European countries. Results suggested that financial incentives were key but were reinforced by training and support.

STUDY 2019 HTM file
Cost-effectiveness of strategies to improve delivery of brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary care: results from the ODHIN trial

Could combinations of three strategies – training and support, financial reimbursement, and the opportunity to refer patients to a website – cost-effectively boost delivery of brief interventions in European primary care? The important aim was to find the best way to narrow the ‘implementation gap’ between the number of patients who could benefit from these interventions and those who receive them.

STUDY 2013 HTM file
Modelling the cost-effectiveness of alcohol screening and brief interventions in primary care in England

Simulation study calculated health care cost savings and benefits for patients in England which make routine GP-based screening and brief advice for excessive drinking look an unmissable bargain, but the key assumptions derived from studies divorced from how interventions would routinely be implemented.

REVIEW 2010 HTM file
Alcohol-use disorders: Preventing the development of hazardous and harmful drinking

In these UK national prevention guidelines, experts prioritised population-wide changes like price rises and outlet restrictions which affect everyone, independent of the choices they make. But in England government prefers to target what they see as the troublesome minority, not the responsible majority.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Interventions to reduce the negative effects of alcohol consumption in older adults: a systematic review

The first review to focus on alcohol interventions for older people found some evidence that psychosocial interventions such as counselling and brief advice were effective, but the studies lacked sufficient detail to determine which elements of the interventions might be having an effect.

STUDY 2017 HTM file
Preventing alcohol and tobacco exposed pregnancies: CHOICES Plus in primary care

Compared to brief advice, the CHOICES Plus intervention significantly lowered the risk of alcohol- and tobacco-exposed pregnancies among women in a low-income primary care population. This US-based trial illustrates the efficacy of a bundle of ‘pre-conception’ services for risky drinking, smoking, and ineffective contraception.


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