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You have found 72 entries. Starting with the most recently added or updated entries, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2008 HTM file
Brief contact and written advice as effective as a longer talk for heavy drinking hospital patients

Scottish study suggests there is no need for sophisticated and extended advice to prompt heavy drinking hospital patients to cut down, making the case for low cost, large scale screening and intervention.

STUDY 2003 PDF file 188Kb
Nurses help prevent hazardous drinking while caring for injured drinkers

This British study found that young men injured after binge drinking respond well to a brief intervention mounted in a hospital clinic dealing with injuries of the kind often related to drinking.

STUDY 2008 HTM file
Universal screening for alcohol problems in primary care fails in Denmark and no longer on UK agenda

Negative findings from a Danish attempt to implement the primary care screening and brief intervention protocol for heavy drinkers which emerged from World Health Organization trials suggest it was right for the UK to turn away from universal screening.

STUDY 2003 PDF file 172Kb
Injury rate cut in heavy drinking accident and emergency patients

One of the few studies to have tried alcohol interventions in the emergency department rather than after admission was also the first to find a significant reduction in later injuries, but only if the initial approach had been reinforced with a booster.

STUDY 2003 PDF file 168Kb
Family doctors' alcohol advice plus follow up cuts long-term medical and social costs

A rare long-term study of a brief alcohol intervention in primary care found substantial drinking reductions and health care and social cost-savings four years later including 41% fewer traffic accidents causing injuries or death.

SERIES OF ARTICLES 2002 PDF file 2075Kb
Investing in alcohol treatment

Two-part series extracted from an impressive Australian review. First, how to identify a drinking problem; second, whether brief talks with heavy drinkers identified by screening work, and how staff can be encouraged to implement them.

REVIEW 2002 PDF file 1279Kb
Investing in alcohol treatment: brief interventions

Second instalment of the comprehensive review funded by Australia's health department examines brief talks to heavy drinkers identified at hospitals or in primary care. Do they work, and how can staff be encouraged to implement them?

OFFCUT 2002 PDF file 228Kb
Web-based support for staff dealing with alcohol problems in primary care

Information and support for GPs considering screening and brief intervention for heavy drinking patients.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 187Kb
Emergency patients benefit from minimal alcohol intervention

Patients screened for alcohol problems in a Swedish emergency surgical ward responded well to a simple brief intervention delivered by ward staff; outcomes were not further improved by professional counselling.

REVIEW 1999 PDF file 841Kb
How brief can you get?

Three pioneering British studies dating back to the late '70s showed that alcohol problems could be reduced without intensive (and expensive) treatments. The implications were and remain immense, the controversy fierce.


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