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You have found 72 entries. Starting with analyses of the most recently published documents, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2011 HTM file
Quality concerns with routine alcohol screening in VA clinical settings

In the US health care service for ex-military personnel, 61% of patients who screened positive when sent a postal survey did not do so when the same questions were asked by their clinics, casting doubt on the validity of the test in routine practice in a service where the emphasis was more on the quantity than the quality of screening.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
A meta-analysis of the efficacy of nonphysician brief interventions for unhealthy alcohol use: implications for the patient-centered medical home

It works when the doctor does it, but what if the nurse or other primary care staff counsel risky drinking patients? It still works – maybe not as well, but perhaps more patients can be reached more cheaply.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
A systematic review and meta-analysis of health care utilization outcomes in alcohol screening and brief intervention trials

Screening for risky drinking and offering brief advice slightly reduces later emergency department visits was the main finding of this review, suggesting these programmes can help ease pressure on overloaded departments. Adding to their attraction, some of the evidence comes from studies in the services set to benefit.

REVIEW 2011 HTM file
Strategies to implement alcohol screening and brief intervention in primary care settings: a structured literature review

Applying a systematic and comprehensive framework to map the strategies trialled in attempts to implement screening and counselling for risky drinking primary care patients gives some clues to what it has taken to achieve a high screening rate, the essential first step in the process.

DOCUMENT 2011 HTM file
Services for the identification and treatment of hazardous drinking, harmful drinking and alcohol dependence in children, young people and adults: Commissioning guide

From England’s gatekeeper to the public provision of health services, guidance for commissioners on how to organise and procure alcohol treatment and brief intervention services in an area which implement related national clinical guidance and satisfy policy requirements.

DOCUMENT 2010 HTM file
Alcohol in our lives: curbing the harm

Extensive policy report from New Zealand accepts evidence that alcohol-related harm is best reduced by population level measures, including raising prices, licensing reform with harm reduction as its prime objective, and restricting the availability of alcohol through reduced opening hours, age limits and curbs on promotion.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
Efficacy of physician-delivered brief counseling intervention for binge drinkers

In Madrid, unusually a primary care brief alcohol intervention targeted heavy episodic or 'binge' drinking. The result was drinking reductions which probably saved lives due to less drunkenness and less drinking overall – and both screening and intervention were done by the doctors themselves, not specialist staff.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
Cluster-randomized controlled trial of dissemination strategies of an online quality improvement programme for alcohol-related disorders

No matter which dissemination strategy was tried, just 4 in 10 GPs in Germany logged in to a government funded online alcohol intervention education and support system. Even among the few practices who joined the study, training was poorly attended.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
Improving lifestyle and risk perception through patient involvement in nurse-led cardiovascular risk management: a cluster-randomized controlled trial in primary care

Dutch general practice patients at risk of cardiovascular disease did not further reduce their risks (including drinking and smoking) in response to motivational counselling from the practice nurse. Why did a well worked out, multi-session intervention fail to better usual care? The probable answer is among the common factors which transcend therapies.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
Brief physician advice for heavy drinking college students: a randomized controlled trial in college health clinics

Can college health clinics do widespread screening and brief alcohol advice? Yes they can, is one conclusion of this first large-scale test conducted at five North American universities. The other main conclusion – that by doing so they make worthwhile reductions in drinking and related harm – is weakened by the small size of the impacts.


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