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You have found 159 entries. Starting with analyses of the most recently published documents, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2002 PDF file 199Kb
A way to encourage drinkers to stick with naltrexone treatment

An intervention which helps overcome the major impediments to naltrexone treatment of alcoholism – patients don't take the pills or drop out – has now been codified in a book which acts as a manual for conducting the intervention.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 300Kb
Brief motivational therapy minimises health care costs except among more problematic drinkers

In the US Project MATCH alcohol treatment trial, relatively brief motivational interviewing resulted in lower health care costs overall but costs incurred by poor prognosis patients were reduced most by the two more intensive (CBT and 12-step) therapies.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 140Kb
Brief interventions help cannabis users cut down

Studies from Australia and the USA show that heavy, long-term cannabis users can be attracted into brief interventions which reduce consumption and improve quality of life and health prospects. For most, longer interventions are unnecessary.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 209Kb
Simple induction procedures help alcohol and drug users engage with residential rehabilitation

In the USA relatively simple extensions to induction procedures for residential rehabilitation made a radical difference to how deeply coerced and other less motivated clients engaged with the programmes.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 171Kb
Encouraging people to return for aftercare

Two simple inexpensive interventions have been shown to make a substantial difference to the rate of return for aftercare following intensive day or residential care, helping maintain the benefits especially for the most vulnerable patients.

STUDY 2000 PDF file 115Kb
Brief intervention leaves teenage drinkers less likely to revisit accident and emergency

A brief intervention intended to reducing harmful/risky drinking and tested on teenagers attending a US emergency unit after an alcohol-related incident substantially cut the number of alcohol-related injuries over the next six months.

STUDY 1999 PDF file 727Kb
Project MATCH: unseen colossus

Aided by the US investigators and British experts, FINDINGS analyses what was intended to be the definitive test of whether different types of alcohol dependent patients benefit from different kinds of psychosocial therapies.

STUDY 1999 PDF file 223Kb
Students respond to brief alcohol intervention

High risk US students selected on the basis of their drinking at school cut their drinking at college in response to a brief face-to-face motivational interview with individualised risk assessments.

STUDY 1993 HTM file
Enhancing motivation for change in problem drinking: a controlled comparison of two therapist styles

Probably more than any other, this seminal study heightened the profile of the therapist's interpersonal style in substance use counselling, seeming to confirm that by not provoking resistance, the non-confrontational style mandated by motivational interviewing reduced drinking compared to the then more typical blunt and challenging approach.


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