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You have found 49 entries after clicking on a search link (usually the MORE information link) in a matrix cell. Sorted by the main topic addressed, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2011 HTM file
Therapist effectiveness: implications for accountability and patient care

1 in 6 US therapists (mainly not specialising in substance use) typically ended up with clients whose substance use problems were significantly worse than when they started therapy, an indication perhaps that social workers and mental health counsellors find these issues especially hard to deal with.

STUDY 2010 HTM file
Gender differences in client-provider relationship as active ingredient in substance abuse treatment

From the comprehensive treatment process data collected by a major national US study emerges the important lesson that retention in itself is not an active ingredient in post-treatment outcomes but reflects influences such having one's needs met (especially important for women) and developing a good relationship with the service and your key worker.

STUDY 2008 HTM file
The impact of worker values on client outcomes within a drug treatment service

From England, findings suggesting the intriguing but for the moment tentative possibility that non-conformist drug workers who value hedonism and stimulation help socially excluded clients improve most because their values match those of their clients.

DOCUMENT 2013 HTM file
Sometimes best to break the rules

Motivational interviewing’s ‘Do not dos’ like avoiding confrontation were intended to sidestep the traps which provoke clients to dig in their heels or disengage. Imagine then the upset of discovering that in certain circumstances, the opposite is the case; the explanation appeared to lie in coming across as ‘genuine’.

COLLECTION 2016 HTM file
The common core of therapy

‘Collections’ are customised Effectiveness Bank searches not available via the standard options in the search pages. Lists entries relating to ‘Dodo bird’ findings that all bona fide therapies tend to have similar effects. Across mental health and behavioural problems, such findings have turned attention to the ‘common factors’ shared by therapies rather than how they differ.

SERIES OF ARTICLES 2006 PDF file 6115Kb
Manners Matter

Five-part series not so much on what treatment services do, but how they do it. Conclusion: the same human qualities which make life better outside treatment make it better within - empathy, understanding, respect, responsiveness, caring persistence.

REVIEW 2004 PDF file 909Kb
The power of the welcoming reminder

Part 1 of the Manners Matter series. In seemingly mundane tasks like reminding patients of appointments and checking how they are doing after they leave, individualised and welcoming communications characterise retention-enhancing services.

REVIEW 2005 PDF file 813Kb
The motivational hallo

Part 3 of the Manners Matter series investigates motivational interviewing, the most influential counselling style in addiction treatment. At first we couldn't believe what we'd found - but it really has worked best without a manual.

STUDY 2006 PDF file 171Kb
Matching resources to needs is key to achieving 'wrap-around' care objectives

Linking treatment intake assessments to a computerised guide to local welfare and medical services transformed the assessments from redundant paperwork into a practical route to the reintegration services being advocated in Britain – and treatment completion rates doubled.

REVIEW 2018 HTM file
Collecting and delivering progress feedback: a meta-analysis of routine outcome monitoring

Findings amalgamated for the American Psychological Association show that outcomes usually improve when therapists are provided with real-time feedback from the client on their progress and on factors affecting it such as the client–therapist relationship. Especially among clients (including substance use clients) who would otherwise deteriorate or not improve, these systems are among the most effective ways available to services to improve outcomes.


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