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Effectiveness bank home page. Opens new window Matrix search results

You have found 49 entries after clicking on a search link (usually the MORE information link) in a matrix cell. Starting with analyses of the most recently published documents, the list shows in orange the type of entry, year the original document was published (or if one of our own documents, the year last updated), and the type of file you will download when you click on the title. In blue is the document’s title followed by a brief description.

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STUDY 2004 PDF file 156Kb
Prison treatment in Scotland fails to impress

The first published findings from the national Scottish drug treatment evaluation highlighted the relative inadequacy and ineffectiveness of treatment inside as opposed to outside prison.

OFFCUT 2003 PDF file 134Kb
Is your measure of success what matters to the client, or what matters to everyone else?

How a patient assesses their own well-being can be poorly related to conventional outcomes such as substance use. Using quality of life as a benchmark would often give a different impression of whether one treatment or service is better than another.

STUDY 2002 PDF file 1321Kb
The grand design: lessons from DATOS

US drug treatment was under fire, over-stretched and facing the new challenge of crack cocaine when the huge DATOS study set out to test whether it was still delivering benefits, how it worked, and how it could be made better. Truly essential reading.

OFFCUT 2002 PDF file 237Kb
Audit Commission paints a stark picture of drug treatment in England and Wales

In 2002 an Audit Commission investigation of drug services and GP involvement in 11 drug action team areas in England and Wales found weak commissioning practices and the absence of management information and effective performance monitoring.

STUDY 2001 PDF file 140Kb
Brief interventions help cannabis users cut down

Studies from Australia and the USA show that heavy, long-term cannabis users can be attracted into brief interventions which reduce consumption and improve quality of life and health prospects. For most, longer interventions are unnecessary.

IN PRACTICE 2000 PDF file 665Kb
Oiling the wheels

From the south west of England, a frank account what it takes to get treatment services to accept the judgements of their peers and to make this an engine for improvement rather than a source of conflict.

STUDY 2000 PDF file 148Kb
English residential rehabilitation services doing well but could do better

A report from the UK National Treatment Outcome Research Study (NTORS) spotlights the achievements of residential services for drug users but more could be done to improve retention and it is unclear how much the treatment had to do with the outcomes.

STUDY 1999 PDF file 223Kb
Treatment staff matter as much as the drug

Three US studies prove there is more to methadone maintenance than the drug. The individual counsellor and whether they respond constructively to patient problems can dramatically affect retention and drug use outcomes.

COLLECTION 2016 HTM file
The common core of therapy

‘Collections’ are customised Effectiveness Bank searches not available via the standard options in the search pages. Lists entries relating to ‘Dodo bird’ findings that all bona fide therapies tend to have similar effects. Across mental health and behavioural problems, such findings have turned attention to the ‘common factors’ shared by therapies rather than how they differ.


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